the beaches

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Rhossili & LLangennith

Rhossili Bay is the most westerly bay on the Gower peninsula and is backed by Rhossili Downs. From the top of Rhossili Hill you have a magnificent view of most of the Gower peninsula. Llangennith at the north end and Rhossili at the south end are both very popular with surfers all the year around. It is the most consistent surfing beach on Gower, with the biggest waves at the north end at Llangennith.

WARNING: There is no Lifeguard patrol on this beach, do not swim in big surf as there are strong undertows. Before you walk out onto Worm's Head please check the tide times carefully and allow enough time to get back.

Llangennith is situated at the northern end of Rhossili Bay and is the surfing capital of Gower. Between Rhossili and Llangennith there is over three miles of sandy beach backed by magnificent sand dunes with Burry Holmes at one end and the sheer cliffs of Rhossili at the other.

WARNING: There is no Lifeguard patrol on this beach, do not swim in big surf as there are strong undertows. Before you walk out onto Burry Holmes please check the tide times carefully and allow enough time to get back.

Mewslade

It is well worth the walk to Mewslade, if you want to get away from the crowds. There are no shops or facilities, but both the beach and scenery are unspoilt. The beach is fully covered at high water, but as the tide drops a beautiful sandy beach with many rock pools is exposed.

WARNING: There is no Lifeguard patrol or phone on this beach, do not swim in big surf as there are strong undertows.

Ramsgrove

Take a walk along the footpath through the farmland down to the rocky cove immediately in front of the farmhouse. Ideal for an evening stroll, beachcombing or for exploring the rock pools.

 

 

Port Eynon + Horton

Port Eynon Bay is a very popular beach. It is close to the village of Port Eynon and has good access, plenty of parking, shops and three quarters of a mile of golden sand backed by sand dunes. It is popular for all types of watersports including, diving, sailing, surfing and windsurfing, with a slipway to the beach. Bathing is safe, but watch out for the boats, keep away from the launching area. There is a Lifeguard patrol during the summer months, you should always swim between the flags.

From Port Eynon you can walk across to Horton beach; Horton village located just above the dunes. Horton beach can also be accessed from the village of Horton itself where there is parking and toilet facilities.

Oxwich

Oxwich Bay is another very popular beach; it has good access, plenty of parking and shops. It is a safe beach for swimming. It is very popular for water-sports which include sailing (slipway), wind-surfing, diving and water-skiing.

WARNING: There is no Lifeguard patrol on this beach, keep away from boats when swimming.

Langland and Caswell

Langland Bay is only about 20 minutes walk from Mumbles. It is famous for its row of traditional beach huts. There is a beach shop situated on the promenade. There are two car parks behind the beach, both Pay & Display. Toilet Facilities in the main car park. There is a footpath that follows the coastline to Caswell Bay.

Caswell Bay is a popular beach all year around. There is a beach shop situated on the seafront. There is a large Pay & Display car park near the beach and toilet facilities. It has a safe sandy beach with easy access and there is a Lifeguard patrol during the summer months. In the winter the beach is popular with surfers. There is a coastal path over to Langland Bay .

Swansea and Mumbles

You can walk (or cycle) from Swansea to Mumbles along the seafront and take in the view across the expanse of Swansea bay. During the summer months there is a road train which runs along the promenade. You can stop on the way at one of the many bars or cafes, buy an ice-cream, play crazy golf, take a dip in the lido at Blackpill, visit the many shops in Mumbles, or just relax on the beach.

 

Worms Head

Park in the car park at Rhossili and head west along the cliff path towards the end of the peninsula and you will find Worm's Head, a mile long serpent-like promontory jutting out into the ocean.

Worms Head is only accessible 2 hours either side of low water. The causeway is covered by the tide outside these times and the currents are treacherous. Take heed of all notices and consults tide tables before attempting to cross the causeway.

 

Fall Bay

Fall Bay is not the easiest beach to reach, but well worth the effort as the beach is never crowded. The path is not suitable for pushchairs and the last part onto the beach is quite steep and can be slippery. At very low tide you can walk over to Mewslade Bay

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